TAP Blog

University of Maryland law professor Frank Pasquale discusses concerns with mental health apps being used as digital substitutes for mental health professionals.
A new article by Georgia Tech law and ethics professor Peter Swire proposes a system for “categorizing and teaching the jumble of non-code yet vital cybersecurity topics.”
Discussing contextual integrity as a framework to design, evaluate, and craft regulation for privacy was the focus of last month’s symposium hosted by Princeton’s Center for Information Technology and Cornell Tech’s Digital Life Initiative. Read the summary of the report.
Harvard business professor William Kerr stresses: “Public leaders considering a fact-based case for high-skill immigration is more important than ever.”
Columbia law professor Tim Wu shares expertise from his time as a Senior Advisor with the Federal Trade Commission to explain how the agency approved Facebook’s acquisition of Instagram. Professor Wu proposes unwinding that merger in order to insert competition to help ‘check’ Facebook’s power.
Among the topics discussed at this year’s Searle Center antitrust conference were the effect of acquisitions on startup projects, the potential for coordination after mergers, and competition policy and innovation.
Stanford economics professor Susan Athey explains why she believes the field of economics and machine learning is “on the verge of exploding.”
In the current digital economy, where consumers’ personal information is gathered, tracked, and used for corporate gain, Harvard professor Jonathan Zittrain and Yale professor Jack Balkin question how consumers can trust online services when there are no real guarantees that online platforms will not abuse that trust.
For a look at the current state of consumer data privacy, read up on recent works by TAP privacy experts. This post provides an overview of some recently published articles and blogs dealing with consumer data.
A new article by Danielle Citron and her co-author Robert Chesney provides the first comprehensive survey of the harms caused by “deep fake” technology, and examines the powerful incentives that deep fakes produce for privacy-destructive solutions.
George Washington law professor Daniel Solove discusses several ethical issues connected with the advances of artificial intelligence.
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