TAP Blog

Posts by Shane Greenstein

Harvard economics professor Shane Greenstein provides a grounded sense of the future of automation and machine learning.
Harvard Business School professor Shane Greenstein explains “How the Internet Became Commercial” by sharing success stories of a few extraordinary individuals within the high tech industries.
Harvard Business School professor Shane Greenstein provides a tongue in cheek look at notable information technology events and people from 2015.
Professor Shane Greenstein, Harvard Business School, discusses the effect of the Internet and Web on the US economy from the 1990s to the present.
Professor Shane Greenstein, Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, looks back on the start of the commercial Internet.
Professor Shane Greenstein offers a look into the Economic Analysis of the Digital Economy, a recently published volume in the National Bureau of Economic Research Conference Report series that he co-edited with Avi Goldfarb and Catherine E. Tucker. This volume presents insights on the functioning and impact of the digital economy.
Professor Shane Greenstein, Northwestern University, examines the economic value of online behavioral data.
It is time again for the best technology events of the year. We have quite a lineup this year, including Sony, Aereo, net neutrality, Home Depot, and a few surprise guest stars.
Economics professor Shane Greenstein, Kellogg School of Management, provides a look at the evolution of the cookie. A small text file used by web pages to collect information about online activity, the cookie plays a role in a long chain of metadata operations, targeted advertising being just one use.
Professor Shane Greenstein, Northwestern University, examines both sides of the Internet ‘fast lanes’ debate from an economics’ perspective. The FCC’s Open Internet Rules, adopted in 2010, were established to make sure that all Internet traffic was treated the same. However, yesterday, the FCC has released a draft document that could allow some Web companies to pay more for faster access.
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